Volume 5, Issue 4, December 2020, Page: 84-89
Prevalence of Myopia and Associated Risk Factors Among Primary Students in the Period of Online Study During COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study in Guangzhou
Fangyuan Chen, First School of Clinical Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Xiaojuan He, Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Junjie Tang, First School of Clinical Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Yuanting Yang, First School of Clinical Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Monzer Fatfat, First School of Clinical Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Jian Chen, Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Qing Zhou, Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Received: Oct. 17, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 27, 2020;       Published: Nov. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijovs.20200504.11      View  43      Downloads  34
Abstract
Introduction: To investigates the impact of online study during COVID-19 on myopia in Chinese primary school students and to further analyze the influencing factors of myopia, so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and control of myopia. Objectives: Cross-sectional study. A total of 905 primary school students from grade 1-6 in Guangzhou city were included in the study. Data were collected from uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), non-cycloplegic photo refraction and an online questionnaire. Myopia was defined as visual acuity < 1.0 or spherical equivalent (SE) of ≤ − 0.50 diopters (D) in either eye. Chi-square and binary logistic regression analysis were applied to investigate the prevalence of myopia for different groups and potential risk factors on myopia. Results: A total of 905 students were evaluated. The mean (standard deviation) age was 9.7(±1.82) years. 699 students were identified to have myopic refractive error making the prevalence of 77.2% ([95% confidence interval (CI): 75.5%–80.0%]; myopia prevalence significantly increased with grade level, from 61.9% (95% CI: 54.0%–69.8%) at grade 1 to 84.0% (95% CI: 80.5%–90.1%) at grade 6. Low myopia (-3.0 D≤ SE ≤ -0.50 D) was account for 83.5% (95% CI: 80.3%–86.3%) among the myopia group, with the mean (standard deviation) SE (-1.32±0.66) D. Compared with children without myopia, the dry symptoms were more serious in myopic students (81.8% vs. 25.2%, χ2 = 5.811, P = 0.016). Moreover, myopia prevalence significantly differences among different exposure natural light level (χ2 = 8.382, P = 0.039). Binary logistic regression analysis showed children who spent more time on online-study or had higher grade level had a higher risk of myopia (OR: 1.147, 95% CI: 1.044–1.259; OR: 1.147, 95% CI: 1.044-1.259). Conclusions: The prevalence of myopia in primary school students from grade 1 to grade 6 in Guangzhou city is higher than previous study conducted in Guangzhou after the online-study during COVID-19. Myopia was significantly positively associated with higher grade, spending a less time outdoors; notably, playing with electronics had the greatest influence on the risk of myopia.
Keywords
Myopia, Primary School Student, Online Study, COVID-19, Cross-Sectional Study
To cite this article
Fangyuan Chen, Xiaojuan He, Junjie Tang, Yuanting Yang, Monzer Fatfat, Jian Chen, Qing Zhou, Prevalence of Myopia and Associated Risk Factors Among Primary Students in the Period of Online Study During COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study in Guangzhou, International Journal of Ophthalmology & Visual Science. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2020, pp. 84-89. doi: 10.11648/j.ijovs.20200504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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